Research

How to plan for simulation integration into undergraduate physiotherapy training

A van der Merwe, R Y Barnes, M J Labuschagne

Abstract


Background. The benefits of simulation in healthcare education are undeniable, and in the current healthcare climate, a drastic change in delivering healthcare training is critical. Therefore, integration of simulation is essential, and necessitates detailed planning and well-trained educators. Objectives. To develop a conceptual framework for the integration of simulation in South African (SA) undergraduate physiotherapy programmes. Methods. A non-experimental descriptive research design using a modified Delphi survey was conducted. Results from a systematic review identifying simulation integration framework elements informed the Delphi survey. A purposive sample of 15 healthcare educationalists from SA and abroad were approached to participate. Data were analysed as percentages, and feedback was provided to panel members following each round.

Results. A response rate of 73.3% (n=11) was achieved. Planning was explored as one of the themes. Both institutional- and discipline-specific needs analyses were identified as essential (93%), and societal needs were useful to consider (64%). Resource identification and sharing (84%) were regarded as vital, and expert collaboration in curriculum development (79%) with scaffolded skills integration (75%) was advised. The necessity for trained facilitators (93%) and educator role identification (71%) was evident. Statements related to mastery learning/deliberate practice and the use of simulation for assessment purposes yielded the least consensus.

Conclusion. A constructively aligned curriculum based on both student and institutional needs and resource availability in guiding simulation integration was regarded as essential. Educator competency in both the development and delivery of the programme, especially debriefing methods, is vital for optimising student learning.


Authors' affiliations

A van der Merwe, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

R Y Barnes, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

M J Labuschagne, Clinical Simulation and Skills Unit, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

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Cite this article

African Journal of Health Professions Education 2022;14(2):61.

Article History

Date submitted: 2022-04-20
Date published: 2022-04-20

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